Auf Wiedersehen und Danke schön!

goodbye

Nuremberg in Numbers:

Twenty-four: the number of weeks I was living in Germany.

Three and a half: the number of months winter lasted.

Eight hundred and sixty-four: the number of hours I worked.

Five: the number of wonderfully dedicated people who came to visit me.

Nine: the number of days I have left.

 

It has been a long journey, but it’s finally coming to an end. I feel like I’ve been here so long at this stage, that I’m pretty much a part of the furniture. However, I feel like a piece of furniture which is living in the wrong house. I have been put there for a while until my old home is ready for me to move back into it again, and every day for the last one hundred and seventy two days I have been looking forward to returning to my proper abode. I’ve been waiting (not always patiently) to come home.

Now, I am on the final stretch. The road before me is smooth and I can just about see the finish line up ahead. It hasn’t always been this way though. There were times along the way when I thought I would never reach the end. I felt tired and alone and I just wanted to sit down in the middle of the path and cry. Cry so hard that my tears formed a river beneath me and carried me the rest of the distance I needed to travel.

But looking back now, I’m glad I walked this route. It wasn’t something I was looking forward to and it definitely isn’t six months I would like to repeat again, but I feel a great sense of accomplishment, knowing that I can do this (and have done it!) on my own.

Despite the fact that winter here lasted what seemed like an eternity and was the coldest in Germany since way back when, I don’t want to paint a picture completed covered with thick, dark clouds, because I feel that would be unfair. Unfair to a city which, I’ll openly admit, is beautiful. The buildings here have been rebuilt and there is a wonderful mix of the old and the new. Riverside cafés, pretzel stands and bakeries filled with assorted glazed pastries on every corner, market stalls specializing in every possible knick-knack, along with an abundance of fountains and statues all contribute to the character of the city.

Of course there will be people and things which I will miss: my work colleagues (i.e my work friends) and the crazy conversations we have together and the uncontrollable laughter which follows, the friends I have made in the apartment complex, the public transport system here (seriously, why can’t there be U-Bahns at home?), the regular restaurants which I frequent and their welcoming staff and last –but by no means least- pretzels! Trying to imagine a world without pretzels is just heartbreaking! Although for the past twenty years I have survived just fine knowing little of their existence, I now find myself wondering “without pretzels, what’s the point?” I figure I’ll just try and stuff as many of them as possible into my case (and face!) before coming home!

So, to sum up, Germany –and Nuremberg in particular- is a very picturesque place. There are some wonderful people here, some great sights and some DELICIOUS breads! This has definitely been an experience to remember, something which has helped me to grow and become independent, and a reminder of how much my home, family and friends mean to me.

Thanks for all the memories, I’ll never forget them.

I guess all that’s left to say now is:

Auf Wiedersehen, Deutschland!

Homeward bound

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Ok, so as promised, today’s post will pertain to my trip home!

For those of you who don’t know me that well (shame on you!), I’m an Irish girl who’s currently living in Germany. I think that’s pretty much all you need to know!

Oh, and I love my family, boyfriend, friends and home country very much!

So, as I was saying, I’m flying home this evening so I can spend a few days at home over Easter (because who wants to eat a load of chocolate on their own!). This means that from this evening until next… *consults a calendar* Thursday (ooh, that’s a week!), I will be out of office, so to speak. I know what you’re thinking; “But Claire, how ever will we survive without your captivating mix of language and life related blog posts until then?!”, to which I say “Breathe. It will be ok. If you are anything like me then you’ll be spending the next few days gorging on vast amounts of chocolate, and will not notice much going on outside of the fridge”.

I am über excited (who says I’m not improving my German here!) about being home again. I am, of course, dreading the travelling again. Let’s do the math here:

Travelling = hard work

Hard work + Claire = Grumpy Claire

*

Hard work = stress

Stress + Claire = even Grumpier Claire

*

Stress = sweating

Sweating + Claire ≠ attractive

Do you see why travelling + Claire ≠ excitement? Now being home + Claire = EXCITEMENT OVERLOAD!! It’s just the travelling part I dislike.

And why? Well because it’s long and tricky and tiresome and there are too many suitcases and not enough aisle space and there are people everywhere and it’s loud and uncomfortable and it seems to go on forever…. like this sentence!

Some people love travelling. They think it’s better than the actual destination. To these people, I say this: [click here por favor]

I would just prefer to be able to click my fingers and *poof* be in the place I wanted to be in. Even when I’m at home this happens- e.g. I’ll be in my house and it’ll be late and my boyfriend will text and I’ll want to be able to just *click* and be out at his. I think this is probably to do with the fact that I am inherently lazy.

Digression aside, I just think travelling would be so much easier if there was no actual travelling involved. To myself, I say this: [one more time with the clickety click]

So to sum up: I’m going home, I don’t like travelling , I’m good at basic math and, as always, memes are fun! ^^

Peace out! xx

Ireland (sham) rocks

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As the Irish representative in Germany I wanted to write briefly about St Patrick’s Day, which is celebrated this Sunday, March 17th. Although currently residing in Nuremberg, I will be sporting green this weekend in honour of my country’s patron Saint. Some of the festivities associated with St Patrick’s Day include:
– Wearing green, white and orange clothing and hats
– Painting shamrocks on your face
– St Patrick’s Day parades, including colourful floats, music and dancing from all over the world
– Dying the rivers green (Chicago is famous for doing this every year)
– And of course, having a pint of Guinness!
St Patrick’s Day is celebrated not just in Ireland, but also in countries such as America, Argentina, Canada, Great Britain, Japan, Russia, New Zealand and Australia. It has become a worldwide event, with people who have never even been to Ireland dressing head to toe in green. It is a day to celebrate all things Irish and I’m looking forward to seeing what Germany has to offer come this Sunday. As they say in Ireland, “Lá Fhéile Pádraig Sona Duit!” (Happy St Patrick’s Day!)

* * * * * *

Als die irische Vertreterin in Deutschland wollte ich kurz über dem St. Patricks Tag, der diesen Sonntag am 17. März gefeiert wird, berichten. Obwohl ich im Moment in Nürnberg wohne, trage ich dieses Wochenende wohl grün, um den Namenspatron Irlands zu ehren. Einige der Feierlichkeiten, die mit dem St. Patricks Tag verbunden werden, sind:
-grüne, weiße und orange Kleidung und Hüte tragen
-sich Kleeblätter auf das Gesicht malen
-St. Patricks Tag Umzüge, bunte Festwägen mit Musik und Tänzen aus aller Welt
-Flüsse grün einfärben (Chicago macht das jedes Jahr und ist dafür bekannt)
-und selbstverständlich, ein Bier (z.B. Guinness) trinken!
Der St. Patricks Tag wird nicht nur in Irland gefeiert, sondern auch in Ländern wie Amerika, Argentinien, Kanada, Großbritannien, Japan, Russland, Neuseeland und Australien. Er ist mittlerweile zu einem weltweiten Ereignis geworden, an dem sogar Leute, die noch nie in Irland waren, von Kopf bis Fuß grün tragen. Es ist einen Tag um alles Irische zu feiern und ich freue mich schon zu sehen, was Deutschland in dieser Hinsicht zu bieten hat.
Wie man in Irland so schön sagt, “Lá Fhéile Pádraig Sona Duit!“ (Einen schönen St. Patricks Tag!)

Accents / Akzente

English

Naturally I have an accent. I myself cannot hear this accent, but I have nevertheless been told it exists.

When people imitate me, they usually put on a high-pitched voice and talk very fast. I do not sound like this unless I am very excited or angry.

Ok so maybe I sound like this, but that’s not my accent, rather my voice.

Anyway, I’m getting off track!

What I wanted to talk about was whether or not accents are picked up when learning a foreign language.

I have a German friend who is going out with an Irish guy for over a year now. She now speaks English with a Cork accent (priceless to hear!).

I’m just wondering if I’ll speak German with a Bavarian accent when I return home. And if so, what does a Bavarian accent sound like? Hopefully less high-pitched!

Tell me about accents you’ve acquire over the years, and how long it took you to acquire them : )

* * * * *

Deutsch

Natürlich habe ich einen Akzent. Ich meinerseits kann dieser Akzent  nicht hören, aber trotzdem bin ich erzählt worden, dass es existiert.

Wenn Leute nach mich ahmen, normalerweise nehmen sie an eine schrille Stimme und sehr schnell reden. Ich klinge nicht so, außer wenn ich sehr aufgeregt oder verärgert bin.

Also vielleicht klinge ich so, jedoch ist das nicht mein Akzent sondern meine Stimme.

Jedenfalls, abschweife ich jetzt vom Thema!

Was ich wollte darüber zu sprechen war ob man sich an einem Akzent eignet oder nicht, wenn er eine Fremdsprache lernt.

Ich habe eine deutsche Freundin, die mit einem irischen Kerl mehr als ein Jahr geht. Jetzt spricht sie Englisch mit einem Cork Akzent (unschätzbar zu hören!).

Ich frage mich ob ich Deutsch mit einem bayerischen Akzent wenn ich nach Hause kehre spreche. Und wenn ja, wie klingt einen bayerischen Akzent? Hoffentlich weniger schrill!

Erzählt mir über Akzente, die ihr im Lauf der Jahre erworben habt und wie lange dauert es euch diese Akzente zu erwerben : )

Cloud scratchers and other such nonsense

...Do you though?

…Do you though?

I love words. I’m a bit of a nerd like that.
I love words and languages. Ooh, and translating.
What I seriously love though are ‘literal translations’, and the nonsense that ensues when one translates literally.
For example, in German, skyscrapers are called Wolkenkratzer, which literally translates to cloud scratchers. Trés cute, right?
So I decided to compile a little list of literal translations, because it’s Wednesday after all, and everyone needs a mid-week smile 🙂

Irish:
freckles póigíní gréine. Literally: little sun kisses
I’m happy Tá áthas orm. Literally: there is happy on me

German:
gloves Handschuhe. Literally: shoes for your hands
Santa Weihnachtsmann. Literally: Christmas man
For God’s sake Himmel, Arsch und Zwirn. Literally: sky, ass and thread
I couldn’t care less Es ist mir wurst. Literally: it is me sausage

Spanish:
you’d make a better door than a window La carne de burro no es transparente. Literally: the flesh of the donkey is not transparent

And that’s today’s language lesson concluded! Remember, WORDS.ARE.FUN but only if you use them wisely!